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Deer Search Inc. Tracking Competition

The Deer Search Inc. Tracking competition took place on April 6, 2013 at Casperkill Game Club Inc.  116 Stone House Road, Rhinebeck, NY 12572.  Seven (7) artificial blood lines were laid out prior to the competition.  The lines were marked out by Bill Siegrist and Gentian Shero.  The blood was put out by Bill Siegrist and Barbara Schmidt.  The time limit for each team was one and one half hours (1 1/2 hours).  Six (6) teams of handler and dog were entered into the competition.  Of the 6 teams entered 3 teams were able to complete the track and place in the competition and three (3) were unable to complete the track and place in the competition.  The DSI judges for the competition were Roger Humeston-Master Handler, Mark Long-Master Handler and Bill Siegrist-Master Handler.  Four members of DSI apprenticed as judges during the competition.  They are: Sue Orlick, Peter Martin, Gentian Shero and Beth Shero.  About 25 Deer Search members and guests attended the competition.
The tracking conditions for the day were not ideal.  At the start of the competition the temperature was about 31 degrees and there was a strong wind out of the north east.  The ground was dry and the leaves were blowing in areas exposed to the wind.  The wind eased up some what as the day progressed .  All of these conditions made for very difficult tracking conditions especially for those who drew the early lines.  The first track began at 8:55am and the last track ended (track 7) at 4:57pm.
Those who competed in the competition where as flows:
1-Andy Bensing and Eibe von Merreche, WHD, First Place, Score 100 for a prize 1, time 26 minutes.  Andy and Eibe had won this competition in the past. (line 3)
2-Darren Doran and Theo Von Moosbach-Zuzelek Sw,WHD, Second Place, Score of 92 for a prize 1, time 30 minutes. (line 5)
3-John Jeanneney and Tom vom Linteler Forst, WHD, Third Place, Score 57 for a prize 3, time of 1 hour and 4 minutes.  (line 1)
4-Chester Swierk and Moby, Finger Lakes Deer Search, miniature long haired dachshund.  At 10:54am, 39 minutes into the track the handler pulled the dog as he felt that the dog was not tracking up to it’s ability.  Chester and Moby had won this competition in the past. (line 2)
5-Bruce Zeman and Anchor vom Apfel Tal, WHD, received three call backs prior to the completion of the track.  However the dog and handler were allowed to complete the track for training purposes in just under one hour.  Both dog and handler tried very hard to complete the line.  With a little more experience for both they will be a productive team for DSI. (line 4)
6-Karen Zeman and Master of Hunt Cyrus, BMH, received three call backs prior to the completion of the track.  However the dog and handler were allowed to complete the track for training purposes in one hour.  Both dog and handler tried very hard to complete the track.  With more training and experience both will be productive for DSI in the future. (line 6)
7-The seventh line was used by John Jeanneney at the end of the day after the competition was completed to certify his dog Sky-von Moosbach-Zuzelek SW.  The judges for this certification were Mark Long, Bill Siegrist and Andy Bensing.  Four DSI members apprenticed during this certification, Sue Orlick, Peter Martin, Gentian Shero and Beth Shero.  John’s dog completed the track in one hour and five minutes and received a score of 67 for a prize 3.
Food for the event came from Duncan Donuts and Rossi’s Deli in Poughkeepsie.  Assisting in the event were Penny Hickman (food and coordination), Barbara Schmidt (food,blood lines, certificates organizing during event), Gentian Shero (marking out tracks), Peter Martin (removing markers from trees), David Wohlbach (training at event), R. Humeston, M. Long,B. Siegrist and A. Bensing Judges for event, R. Humeston working with apprentice judges. Jerry Siegrist and Fred Miller from Casperkill assisted in transportation of dogs and contestants during the event.
Four (4) DSI pins were given out to those who completed the competition.  That leaves DSI with 14 pins for future events.
A total of $175.00 was collected for the event from those who registered.  Those checks were turned over to Treasures David Wohlbach at the April 4th, 2013 DSI meeting.
The applications and score sheets for the judges will be filed with the blood tracking records.
I request that Deer Search consider making a small donation to Casperkill for the use of the club house and property for this event.
Respectfully Submitted,
Bill Siegrist
Chairman of the Blood Tracking committee

Fun in the Woods. Who Needs a Gym?

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Brambles and grapevines are a great mix to keep an old man agile and active. The necessary dodging, ducking and crouching does more good than any workout at the gym. Each call I take is tougher than the last, but my legs get stronger to meet the challenge.

The call I took yesterday taught me a few things. It was a big bow-shot buck, hit ‘too far back” at 8 AM.. the hunter and his buddies had tracked it about a half mile. Then the blood sign ran out, and I was called in at 2:30 PM. There was plenty of scent, and it was no problem for Tommy to start and follow. After only a hundred yards we jumped the buck, and he made a tight circle in a thick swamp with a deep creek flowing though it, When you get wet, you stay cool.

And I was happy to see that the buck was staying close in thick stuff, He won’t go far, I thought. Ha! After that tight loop, he lined out though the briars for over a mile, The creek meandered back and forth so that we could cool off several times. The steep clay slopes had me on my hands and knees coming out. I envied Tommy’s four legs and claws.

We crossed a harvested corn field. …no blood, but I could see the big splayed hoof prints…. on into a stretch of open hardwoods. Much easier going. Then we found a bed with a few smears of blood. But the buck was gone, and we tracked after him as fast as we could go, which wasn’t very fast.

Now it was getting dark. The hunter and I agreed that we wouldn’t catch up any time soon, and we had no lights with us. I marked the scent line as it came out of another creek, and we slopped our way out to a road where we were picked up. Our plan was to pick up the line the next morning and track to the buck that should be dead or very weak. That was the plan, but what are plans in the passion of the hunt?

The next morning, as I was getting ready to leave for the track, the hunter called. He hadn’t been able to sleep, and he had worried about the coyotes. At 1:30 AM he had gone back to my marker and searched ahead for a 100 yards. There was the 10 point buck, dead.

Because I tracked it 1 1/2 miles without blood, I’m claiming it as a find for Tommy. But Tommy never got a chew.

Tough Call

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While my beloved monitor (that’s Jolanta) was napping on the couch, I had a chance to sneak out on a deer call. With Tracking Dog Tommy on the seat beside me, we hit the road driving south. It sounded like a stomach shot, back in the “rear ribs”, but you never know.

When we got to the hit site, thirty miles away, it was mid-afternoon, 23 hours after the deer had been shot. The woods were dry. At the Kleenex marking the first blood, which I couldn’t see, Tommy’s tail said “Yes!” and he started off, slowly and carefully

Tommy saved the day. There was almost no blood, but he worked patiently, through one difficult check after another, for 500 yards. We had an audience of the hunter and three others wondering why we saw only two tiny drops of blood over 500 yards. Could you trust a dog that much?

Then Tommy showed us the buck lying in the thick stuff. He hadn’t been dead long; the venison was still good and this time the coyotes had missed their banquet. Tommy got his reward of deer heart, and Old John felt 20 years younger.

Written by John Jeanneney

Two Old Men in the Woods

John Jeanneney

Today was the fist day of our bow season and my first day of tracking at age 79. I have total confidence in my tracking dog Tommy, but I confess that I was a bit concerned about my own agility in the woods. Jolanta was even more concerned and went along so that she could call in the EMS helicopter if necessary.

I was almost relieved when I met the hunter. He was slightly younger than I am, but in considerably worse physical shape. I knew that no one was going to laugh at me in this situation. It turned out that he had brought along his own daughter/caregiver, who got along just fine with Jolanta.

Fortunately Tommy Tracker was the one who really had his act together. The start was complicated because there were no markers, and the hunter could not find any blood to verify the line. We ended up going to the “point of loss”, which is not the ideal place to begin. Here there was a confusing pattern of muscle blood that had been walked over by the hunter. Tommy figured the mess out and took a line. Blood… Blood…. Then a long stretch with no blood, but I could see that Tommy was confident. “Trust your dog.”

The deer was a big doe, shot quartering away with a Rage expandable broadhead. We had hoped for a one-lunger at least, but had seen nothing but muscle blood. As you know, Rage broadheads have been know to deflect along a rib cage. The doe never laid down, but after a quarter mile in very dense cover, I could tell by Tommy’s body language that he had jumped her. The hunter also found a drop of blood, which laid any doubts to rest.We were on the line.

We pushed another 100 yards, and then all agreed that this big venison package was not “gettable”. The hunter’s family was in need of the meat, but we had to face reality. At least I could face the reality of some fine dog work. This was enough for me and Tommy and Jolanta. We will help this hunter another day.

A gut-shot buck recovered by John and Tommy in Berne

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On November 21 John and Tommy recovered a gut-shot deer in Berne. It was around 0.5 mile track. At the beginning it was not obvious that the deer was gut-shot. There was a stretch of no-blood, and later every few yards or so there was a small speck. Tommy jumped a deer, and followed it well. John had to dispatch the buck at the end of the trail, which was around 6 hours old. This was 10th recovery for the team.

-John Jeanneney

John Jeanneney and his dog Tommy help recover deer for hunter Justin Crosier

Late in the afternoon of our bow season’s opener, October 1, the buck was hit high in the lungs. He had been grazing near the edge of a large hayfield. After the hit, the hunter, Justin Crosier, saw the deer enter the woods on the far side of the field and found a few drops of blood there. He eye tracked perhaps 50 yards and then ran out of blood.

Justin Crosier with the deer, which was recovered by Tommy and his handler John Jeanneney
Justin Crosier with the deer, which was recovered by Tommy and his handler John Jeanneney

I started Tommy the next morning at the hit site, where there was no visible blood, and he tracked easily 200 yards across the field and into the woods at the correct spot. By this time he was familiar with all the different scents that the deer had left behind. In the woods he tracked about 150 yards with occasional drops of blood.

Then there was nothing, and he changed direction. I could see that Tommy was not sure. At my question, “Is that right?” he corrected himself, went back on his own to where he was sure of the line. Confidently he went down through the hemlock woods, although there was no blood to be seen. After another 150 yards there was a small, steep creek crossing and there on the rocks we saw blood! We tracked out of the creek gorge and into a small field. No blood there. Tommy worked slowly and carefully around the field and into a thick weedy patch where the buck had exited. No blood, but Tommy’s body language said “I’m sure”. We tracked to another deep, narrow creek bed and I looked up stream to see the deer’s hind quarters. “Here he is!” Tommy and Justin the hunter were both very pleased. I was pretty happy myself.

-John Jeanneney

DSI Annual Picnic 2012

Our annual picnic will be held on Sunday, July 22nd 2012, rain date the 29th, at the Pleasant Valley Trout and Game Club at Noon. There will be a short club meeting scheduled and if anyone wishes to bring their dogs, that is fine, but Bill Siegrist said we won’t have any dog events scheduled. The day is to socialize, meet other members and their families and enjoy good food.

Please bring a dish to share and any special drinks, food or whatever you prefer. DSI will provide hamburgers, hot dogs, soda and snacks.

Fishing is available (nice trout), and bring any games or sports equipment you want. Do not forget your lawn chairs.

Email or call me, if possible, to get a head count if you are attending or not so we can finalize plans.

The place…
Pleasant Valley Trout and Game Club
1208 Salt Point Turnpike
Pleasant Valley New York 12569

Directions…
Club grounds are at 1208 Salt Point Turnpike:
Take Route 44 to the traffic light in Pleasant Valley (CVS Pharmacy on northeast corner).
Turn north on West Road and go about 1.2 miles (T-intersection with Salt Point Turnpike).
Turn right onto Salt Point Turnpike and go about 1.5 miles to the Club’s entrance on the right.
I’ll see you there and we’ll look forward to some nice weather and good friends and neighbors.
MARK YOUR CALENDAR…SAVE THE DATE!!!

Check your email on Sunday AM the 22nd if there is bad weather and we have to use the rain date of the 29th. Penny and I will decide sometime on Sat, the 21st, and get the word out ASAP. Any questions call me – Bruce.

DSI Picnic Coordinators
Karen & Bruce Zeman

DSI Seminar – Leashed Tracking Dog Exam

The seminar will be held August 4th at 5pm at the Town hall in Pleasant Valley. The seminar will be given by Dave Wohlbach and Bill Siegrist will help. The information below might be of interest to our members and the seminar might inspire some else. The seminar is for DSI members only.

August 19 – Leashed Tracking Dog Exam; Sign-up by August 12.
Sign-up by August 12 to take the leashed tracking dog license exam on August 19 from 10 a.m. to noon at designated DEC regional offices (http://www.dec.ny.gov/about/50230.html) near you. The license allows for the use of a trained dog to track and find dead, injured, or wounded deer and bear during the Big Game Hunting Season. If interested, you must fill out and send in an application by August 12 to: DEC Special Licenses Unit, 625 Broadway, Albany , NY 12233-4752 . To get an application and find out more details of the license, visit the Leashed Tracking Dog License (http://www.dec.ny.gov/permits/25020.html) page, or contact the DEC Special Licenses Unit by phone: 518-402-8985 or by e-mail: fwslu@gw.dec.state.ny.us

DSI Annual Picnic 2011

It’s almost here!!!

Our annual picnic will be held Sunday, July 17th at the Pleasant Valley Trout and Game Club at 11 AM. There will not be any club meeting scheduled and if anyone wishes to bring their dogs, that is fine, but due to time constraints, we won’t have any dog events. The day is to socialize, meet other members and their families and enjoy good food.

Please bring a dish to share and any special drinks, food or whatever you prefer. DSI will provide hamburgers, hot dogs, soda and snacks.

Fishing is available (nice trout), and bring any games or sports equipment you want.

The place…
Pleasant Valley Trout and Game Club
1208 Salt Point Turnpike
Pleasant Valley New York 12569

Directions…
Club grounds are at 1208 Salt Point Turnpike:
Take Route 44 to the traffic light in Pleasant Valley (CVS Pharmacy on northeast corner).

Turn north on West Road and go about 1.2 miles (T-intersection with Salt Point Turnpike).

Turn right onto Salt Point Turnpike and go about 1.5 miles to the Club’s entrance on the right.

We will see you there and we’ll look forward to some nice weather and good friends and neighbors.